EAHN 2020, Edinburgh: Call for Papers

David Roberts (1796–1864), Edinburgh from the Castle, 1847, Oil on canvas, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection
Source: Yale Center for British Art / public domain

European Architectural History Network Sixth International Meeting
Edinburgh, Scotland, 10-13 June 2020

The scientific committee for EAHN 2020 in Edinburgh has selected twenty-five sessions and round tables for the conference, and published the call for papers for these panels. I am no longer actively involved in the EAHN, but am delighted to see that the colleagues currently leading the organization have pulled together such a varied and stimulating program. For complete details on the call for papers, see the conference website and the listing of panels. An additional webpage provides a convenient overview of all the panels with their individual details.

EAHN 2020 CALL FOR PAPERS – DEADLINE 20 SEPTEMBER 2019

The call for papers (sessions) and discussion positions (round tables) is now live. The deadline is 20 September 2019, and proposals should be submitted to the Session Chairs, whose details may be found below. All proposals should include the following information:

· A proposal, in English, of no more than 300 words

· The title of the paper, or discussion position

· Your name

· Your professional affiliation

· A short curriculum vitae (maximum of two pages)

· A mailing address, email address and telephone number

Sessions will consist of either five papers or four papers and a respondent, with time for dialogue and questions at the end. Each paper will be limited to a 20-minute presentation. Abstracts for presentations should define the subject and summarize the argument to be presented in the proposed paper. The content of that paper should be the product of well-documented original research that is primarily analytical and interpretative rather than descriptive in nature.

Round tables will consist of five to ten participants and an extended time for dialogue, debate and discussion among chair(s) and public. Each discussant will have 10 minutes to present a position. Abstracts for round table debates should summarize the position to be taken in the discussion.

Please note: papers may not have been previously published, nor presented in public. Only one submission per author will be accepted. All abstracts will be held in confidence during the selection process. In addition to the thematic sessions and round tables listed below, open sessions may be announced in due course – details to be provided on the conference website.

Sessions and Round Tables:

● Urban planning during state socialism: global ambitions, national ideologies and local desires

● Public Health in the Early Modern City: Salutogenesis Through Architecture

● Ephemerality and Monumentality in Modern Europe (c.1750-1900)

● Splitted Cultures/New Dialogues: Research in Architectural History and Theory

● User Comfort, Functionality, and Sustainability as (Early?) Modern Architectural Concerns

● Shifting Identities of the Ottoman Vernacular

● Migration and Domesticity in the Long Nineteenth Century

● Cosmopolitanism’s Others: Transnational Architecture and Planning beyond Europe and North America

● Design as Process in Pre-Modern Architecture

● Rethinking Architecture for Friars: Process and Spatial Solutions in the Medieval and Early Modern Europe, 1200 – 1500

● English as the Academic Lingua Franca?

● The Urban Commons: Collective Actors, Architectural Agency and the City

● Multilateralism since 1945. From the Comecon to the Belt and Road Initiative

● The Role of Women in the Building of Cities in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

● Architects do not make buildings: A last call for disegno

● Drive-In Architecture, Carriage to Motor Age

● Radical Exchanges between Latin America and Europe in the Everlasting Sixties

● Hotels in the Global South and the Architectures of Contact Zones

● Empires of Heritage: World Monuments before UNESCO

● European Welfare Landscapes: Histories and Futures

● Southern Exchanges: Relocating Architectural Knowledge Production

● Territories of incarceration: The project of modern carceral institutions as an act of rural colonisation

● Flexibility and its Discontents: Techniques and Technologies in Twentieth Century Architectural Production

● Genius Loci: The Politics of Pre-Modern Architectural Style

● Cultivating the Child Eye’s View

EAHN 2020: Call for Sessions and Roundtables

European Architectural History Network Sixth International Meeting
Edinburgh, Scotland, 10-13 June 2020

Although I have stepped back from active involvement in the European Architectural History Network (EAHN), I am happy to note and share information about the preparations for the organization’s next biennial conference in 2020. After earlier international conferences in Guimarães, Brussels, Turin, Dublin, and Tallinn, the sixth edition will take place in Edinburgh. If you have been considering organizing a panel or roundtable on any aspect of architectural history – from antiquity through medieval, early modern, or modern and contemporary – this offers an excellent opportunity!

From the conference website:

Call for Session and Roundtable Proposals

The European Architectural History Network is delighted to announce its next biannual meeting at the University of Edinburgh, UK, 10-13 June 2020. In accordance with EAHN’s mission, the meeting aims to increase the visibility of the discipline of architectural history, to foster transnational, interdisciplinary and multicultural approaches to the study of the built environment, and to facilitate the exchange of research in the field. EAHN is a European organisation, but its intellectual scope is global, and the meeting welcomes proposals on any architectural historical topic. As well as topics on any aspect of the built environment, proposals on landscape and urban history are also very welcome, along with proposals dealing with the theories, methodologies and historiographies of architectural history.

Proposals are sought in two basic formats: (1) a Session, and (2) a Roundtable debate. A Session should consist of 4-5 paper presentations, with a respondent, and time for dialogue and discussion at the end. A Roundtable debate should be an organised as a discussion between panel members, and the format would suit topics of particular urgency, or contemporary relevance. Roundtables should also aim to activate audience discussion as far as possible. Sessions and Roundtables may be chaired by more than one person.

Anyone wishing to chair a Session or a Roundtable debate at EAHN2020 are invited to submit proposals by 31 December 2018. Chairs should make clear whether their proposal is a Session, or a Roundtable.

Please note that EAHN is self-funding, and chairs are expected to provide all their conference expenses, including travel and accommodation.

Deadline: 31 December 2018
Please visit the conference website to submit a session proposal, or for further information.

Guarini – Saarinen?

The Church of the Immacolata Concezione, Turin, and Modernism

In a December 2009 review of an exhibition on Eero Saarinen published in the Brooklyn Rail, the art critic Joseph Masheck wrote about the relation of certain aspects of modernism to the twentieth-century “rediscovery of the Baroque.” Mascheck, who was awarded the 2018 Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art by the College Art Association last week, specifically compared Saarinen’s forms with those of Guarino Guarini:

The Finnish-American Saarinen (1910-1961) is not unfamiliar in this context, if only owing to those who seem to think that the TWA Terminal (1958-62) at what is now John F. Kennedy International Airport must not be modernist because modernism means rectilinearity, and even they can see that this building is as curvy as Gina Lollobrigida.

“when I teach the building I show the similarity of its ground plan to the interpenetrating lobes of the plan of Guarino Guarini’s Church of the Immaculate Conception, Turin”

Surely a main spiritual “function” of the building was to coddle against Reisefieber the many travelers who some fifty years ago were waiting to take their first flight. Well, who said modernism can’t be polymorphous perverse! Actually, I’ve always thought that building had vital entailments, not only in regard to contemporary art—notably the Louisiana-born, ever-verging-on-tacky José de Rivera (1904-1985), whose curvaceous, revolving polished chrome sculptures are rather embarrassingly coincident with Saarinen’s forms, if not his saving amplitude—but also to art history. Ever since it was new it has seemed to me that the voluptuousness of its modernism, following upon Le Corbusier’s Ronchamp Chapel (1950-55), related just as vitally to the rediscovery of the Baroque, of which 18th-century rationalists had, one thought, definitively disposed. To this day, when I teach the building I show the similarity of its ground plan to the interpenetrating lobes of the plan of Guarino Guarini’s Church of the Immaculate Conception, Turin, of 1672-97, which was popularly accessible at the time of the terminal’s construction through Henry A. Millon’s still fascinating Baroque and Rococo Architecture (Braziller, 1961).

In fact, Millon deemed the Immacolata Concezione “Guarini’s most influential church design,” referring to its progeny in the eighteenth-century German-speaking regions. “The space, although violently shaped,” he noted, “is not interrupted but merges into an incredibly dynamic and expressive entity.” The same could also be said of Saarinen’s TWA terminal. Even more than the ground plan, Saarinen’s roof recalls Guarini’s vault – pinched and depressed in the center, and billowing upward as it expands at either end.

The Immacolata Concezione – technically only attributed to Guarini, but convincingly so – was not widely known before its appearance in Millon’s Baroque and Rococo Architecture. Notably, it did not feature in Rudolf Wittkower’s Pelican survey Art and Architecture in Italy, 1600-1750 (1958). While planning for the TWA terminal began well before the publication of Millon’s text, leaving any causal connection between the flight center and the Turinese church largely speculative, Guarini’s design clearly intrigued another prominent architect of the 1960s. Robert Venturi went on to include the Immacolata Concezione in his Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1966), where it was the only building by Guarini represented. Venturi characterized the church as “a duality in plan and yet a unity,” citing Millon’s textbook as the source for his illustration. As part of Venturi’s influential book, the church entered the standard historical repertoire of late modernism and nascent postmodernism.

Further Reading:

Chiesa della Immacolata Concezione on the Città e Cattedrali website.

Chiesa della Immacolata Concezione on the Museo Torino website.

Immacolata Concezione as part of the “Documentazione Chiese Storiche” on the website of the Associazione Guarino Guarini.

Photo gallery of the church, on the website of Studio di Architettura Momo, responsible for restoration of the facade in 2006.

● Henry A. Millon, Baroque and Rococo Architecture (New York: George Braziller, 1961). [On the Immacolata Concezione, see pp. 22-23.]

● Luciano Tamburini, Le chiese di Torino: dal Rinascimento al Barocco, 2nd ed. (Turin: Edizioni Angolo Manzoni, 2002): 269-278.

● Henry A. Millon, “La chiesa dell’Immacolata Concezione a Torino,” in G. Dardanello, S. Klaiber, H. A. Millon, eds., Guarino Guarini (Turin: U. Allemandi,2006): 365-375.

Entangled Histories, Multiple Geographies Proceedings Published

Papers from EAHN 2015, Belgrade

Most of the papers presented in October 2015 at the European Architectural History Network regional thematic conference Entangled Histories, Multiple Geographies are now available in the conference proceedings. At just over 300 pages, the proceedings include thirty-seven papers, many with numerous illustrations.

Contributions consider chronologies from ancient, medieval, and early modern through modern and contemporary, with topics examining issues such as cultural transfer, historiography, restoration, identity, and the politics of conflict. The conference featured a distinct emphasis on central and eastern Europe, as well as the eastern Mediterranean region, although other geographies were also represented.

Click here to download the EAHN 2015 proceedings.

Call for Papers: EAHN 2018 in Tallinn

European Architectural History Network Fifth International Meeting, 13-16 June 2018

Tallinn, Toompea moat
Source: Europeana Collections / Harjumaa Muuseum / Public Domain (CC0 1.0)

Although I am not involved with planning the next biennial EAHN conference, I am delighted to note the rich and stimulating Call for Papers for the Fifth International Meeting in Tallinn next year. The conference website describes the twenty-seven panels in detail. If you prefer a PDF, download it here. Take a look, there’s something for (almost) everybody!

Submission deadline: 30 September 2017

Abstracts are invited for the fifth European Architectural History Network International Meeting, in Tallinn, June 2018. Please submit your abstract by 30 September 2017 to one of the sessions and round tables listed below. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted straight to the session convenor(s). Include your name, affiliation, title of paper or position, a C.V. of no more than five pages, home and work addresses, e-mail addresses and telephone numbers.

Sessions will consist of either five papers or of four papers and a respondent with time for questions and dialogue at the end. Each paper should take no more than 20 minutes to present. Abstracts for session presentations should define the subject and summarize the argument to be made in the presented paper. The content of that paper should be the product of well-documented original research that is primarily analytical and interpretive rather than descriptive.

Round tables will have no more than six participants plus chairs and an extended time for dialogue, debate and discussion among participants and their public. Each discussant will have 10 minutes to present a position. Abstracts for round tables should summarize the position to be taken.

Papers may not have been previously published, nor presented in public. Only one submission per author will be accepted. All abstracts will be held in confidence during the selection process.

Session and roundtable chairs will notify all persons submitting abstracts of the acceptance or rejection of their proposals and comment upon accepted ones no later than 31 October 2017. Authors of accepted paper proposals must submit the complete text of their papers to their chairs by 15 February 2018. Chairs may suggest editorial revisions to a paper or position in order to make it satisfy session or round table guidelines and will return it with comments to the speaker by 15 March 2018. Chairs reserve the right to withhold a paper or discussion position from the program if the speaker has refused to comply with these guidelines. It is the responsibility of the chair(s) to inform speakers of these guidelines, as well as of the general expectations for both a session and participation in this meeting. Each speaker is expected to fund his or her own registration, travel and expenses to Tallinn, Estonia.

Consult the EAHN 2018 conference website for full details about deadlines, venue, and other conference information.

* * *

Additional Guidelines for Paper Sessions:

No paper may have more than two authors. Final presented papers should be no more than 2500 words, although texts of up to 4000 words, including notes, may be included in the proceedings (submission to the proceedings is optional).

Additional Guidelines for Roundtables:

Initial position statements should be no more than 1250 words. Position statements of up to 2500 words including notes will be accepted for the proceedings (submission to the proceedings is optional).

Deadlines:

Submissions of paper proposals and roundtable discussions to session chairs:
30 September 2017

Communication by session chairs of acceptance or rejection and comments on accepted abstracts:
31 October 2017

Submission of Final Edited Abstracts to Session and Conference Chairs:
30 November 2017

Submission of Complete Draft of Paper or Position Statement to Session Chairs:
15 February 2018

Comments on Papers and Position Statements to be Returned by Session Chairs:
15 March 2018

Submission of Final Paper or Position Statement to Chair and, if to be included in Conference Proceeding, to Conference Chair:
1 April 2018

Download CFP
Click here to download this CFP in PDF form.

Histories in Conflict: Cities | Buildings | Landscapes

Jerusalem: panoramic view taken from the Mount of Olives, photograph by Joseph Philibert Girault de Prangey Source: Gallica / Bibliothèque nationale de France

Jerusalem: panoramic view taken from the Mount of Olives, photograph by Joseph Philibert Girault de Prangey
Source: Gallica / Bibliothèque nationale de France

EAHN 2017, Jerusalem: Call for Papers

Van Leer Jerusalem Institute, Jerusalem
13-15 June 2017

The European Architectural History Network is pleased to announce its Third Thematic Conference Urban Histories in Conflict. On the 50th anniversary of the Israeli occupation of East Jerusalem and the contentious unification it legislated, the conference aims to open up questions about the purpose of writing histories of urban conflicts. We ask how can historians account for the predicaments of violence and uneven distributions of power in the built environment, particularly in the face of current worldwide geo-political crises.

Download the full call for papers or consult the EAHN website for the latest conference updates.

Key Dates: abstract submission by 2 December 2016, full papers due by 1 May 2017.

* * *

Reminder:

The EAHN Fifth International Meeting (Tallinn, 13-16 June 2018) Call for Session Proposals deadline is 12 December 2016. Download the call for sessions, or visit the conference website for more information.

Tallinn (Reval), by Matthäus Merian, 1640Source: ETH-Bibliothek Zürich, Bildarchiv / Fotograf: Unbekannt / Fel_038335-RE / Public Domain Mark

Tallinn (Reval), by Matthäus Merian, 1640
Source: ETH-Bibliothek Zürich, Bildarchiv / Fotograf: Unbekannt / Fel_038335-RE / Public Domain Mark

EAHN 2018 in Tallinn: Call for Session Proposals

EAHN 2018 Tallinn logo

 

 

 

After Guimarães 2010, Brussels 2012, Turin 2014, and Dublin 2016, the European Architectural History Network‘s Fifth International Meeting will take place in Tallinn from 13-16 June 2018. Please note the recently published call for session proposals available on the conference website – the due date is 12 December 2016.

Or download a PDF of the EAHN 2018 Call for Session Proposals here.

Abstracts Available for EAHN 2016, Dublin

Upcoming European Architectural History Network Conference, 2-4 June 2016

EAHN 2016 AbstractsAbstracts of the papers in the sessions and roundtables of the European Architectural History Network’s Fourth International Meeting can now be downloaded from the conference website. The full program of tours, keynote presentations, and other events may also be consulted there.
With a little more than a month to go until the conference, registration is still open. If the abstracts whet your appetite for a trip to Ireland with a few intense days devoted to great offerings for architectural historians, this is the time to sign up!

Session Lineups Announced for EAHN 2016

 

Fourth International Meeting of the European Architectural History Network, Dublin (June 2016)

The EAHN 2016 organizing committee has announced the roster of speakers and papers for the sessions and roundtables at the upcoming EAHN 2016 conference in Dublin.  Over 150 participants will be chairing or presenting in the twenty-four panels from 2-4 June 2016.  Topics range from medieval tower houses through Georgian architecture to “Architecture of the Antipodes”, time travel, and big data.

For the complete listing of session topics and paper titles, visit the conference website or download the PDF of the conference roster.

By the way – early bird rates for conference registration are available before 1 March 2016.

Maps above: the urban development of Dublin from 1682 through 1915. Click on images for details.

Call for Papers, EAHN 2016 in Dublin

Deadline 30 September 2015

EAHN_Dublin_logoThe Fourth International Meeting of the European Architectural History Network (EAHN) will be held in Dublin, 2-4 June 2016. The call for papers for the conference has just been published, inviting submissions for twenty thematic sessions and four roundtables. Visit the conference website for the full call for papers and related information.